Linda Chavez

Chairman

Center for Equal Opportunity

Linda Chavez

Chairman

Center for Equal Opportunity

Linda Chavez is the chairman of the Center for Equal Opportunity and a senior fellow at the Niskanen Center in Washington, DC. In 2000, Chavez was honored by the Library of Congress as a “Living Legend” for her contributions to America’s cultural and historical legacy. In January 2001, Chavez was President George W. Bush’s nominee for Secretary of Labor until she withdrew her name from consideration.

Chavez has held a number of appointed positions, among them Chairman, National Commission on Migrant Education (1988-1992); White House Director of Public Liaison (1985); Staff Director of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights (1983-1985); and she was a member of the Administrative Conference of the United States (1984-1986). Chavez was the Republican nominee for U.S. Senator from Maryland in 1986. In 1992, she was elected by the United Nations’ Human Rights Commission to serve a four-year term as U.S. Expert to the U.N. Sub-commission on the Prevention of Discrimination and Protection of Minorities.

Contributions

Deep Dive Episode 186 – Teaching About Race in the Curriculum

July 7, 2021

This episode features a panel discussion on the current debates over how best to teach American history.

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Explainer Episode 24 – The Future of Title IX Implementation

April 30, 2021

Edward E. Bartlett and Linda Chavez join the podcast to discuss the future of Title IX implementation under the Biden administration.

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Deep Dive Episode 125 – The New Title IX Rules

August 13, 2020

This live podcast discusses and analyzes what new Title IX rulemaking means for students, schools, potential legal challenges, and future administrations.

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Deep Dive Episode 91 – The Expected New Title IX Rules

March 3, 2020
In this episode, Linda Chavez moderates as KC Johnson and Stuart Taylor discuss the implications for anticipated Department of Education rules governing Title IX campus proceedings on allegations of sexual assault and harassment.
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Deep Dive Episode 71 – Accounting for Race 101: Virginia Universities and Racial Preferences

October 7, 2019

This episode features audio from a September 10 panel that explored the implications of a study by the Center for Equal Opportunity that examines how five Virginia public universities preference certain applicants based on race.

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Accounting for Race 101: Virginia Universities and Racial Preferences

September 24, 2019

On September 10, 2019, The Federalist Society hosted a luncheon co-sponsored with the Center for Equal Opportunity (CEO). CEO released and presented a new study and report entitled “Race and Ethnicity in Undergraduate Admissions at Five Virginia Universities,” which examined how admissions programs at five Virginia public universities (University of Virginia, College of William & Mary, Virginia Tech, James Madison University, and George Mason University) preference certain applicants based on race. The results of the study and its implications for the broader academic discussion of racial preferences in college admissions were discussed by the panelists.

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Are U.S. Colleges and Universities Barring Asian Applicants Based on their Race?

May 30, 2018

The Regulatory Transparency Project and the Center for Equal Opportunity co-sponsored a discussion on the admissions practices at elite colleges as they affect Asian American applicants.

Linda Chavez and her CEO colleagues presented and released a new study and report entitled “‘Too Many Asian Americans?’ Affirmative Discrimination in Elite College Admissions.” The CEO study illustrates that while Caltech admissions decisions are race-blind, its elite sister institutions Harvard University and MIT have established “ceilings”—or a limit—on Asian American acceptances. In addition to addressing the direct ramifications of their study’s findings, event panelists also discussed the unintended consequences of these admissions practices, whether current regulations are adequate to address issues of racial discrimination in college admissions, and what additional role government or civil society may play in redressing racially discriminatory admissions practices.

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