Promoting a More Adaptable Physician Pipeline

In this paper, James Capretta argues that the current system for regulating the physician workforce is not flexible enough to ensure that enough doctors make it into the field to serve all patients. Mr. Capretta offers a number of reforms that, he argues, would streamline the educational and licensing processes for new and immigrating doctors.

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Competitor’s Veto: State Certificate of Need Laws Violate State Prohibitions on Monopolies

In this paper, Christina Sandefur argues that well-intentioned laws designed to limit wasteful spending, known as certificate-of-need laws, no serve mostly to allow market incumbents in healthcare to keep new entrants out of the market. This, she argues, is harmful to the public and stands in violation of state anti-monopoly laws.

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Putting the Public Back In “Public Interest” in Patent Law

In this paper, the authors lay out a conception of the proper place of ‘public interest’ in patent law, and what they see as current, detrimental uses of that principle. Properly applied, the notion serves the public by promoting innovation, but improperly applied, they argue, public interest can serve to stifle progress.

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The Land Use Labyrinth: Problems of Land Use Regulation and the Permitting Process

In this paper, the authors argue that the uncertainty in local land-use rules often makes new building prohibitively risky, costly, and complex. The ambiguity of these rules and the lack of substantial legal recourse for those seeking to build, they suggest, hampers entrepreneurship and healthy economic development and increases inequality. Finally, the authors suggest a set of reforms that might improve the current state of affairs.

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Potential Constitutional Conflicts in State and Local Data Privacy Regulations

This paper lays out a set of constitutional concerns pertaining to certain new state and local regulations on data privacy. Do these new rules impinge on free speech, violate the dormant commerce clause, or are they preempted by other federal laws?

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Live, Work, Share: Putting out the Welcome Mat to Home-Sharing and Home-Based Businesses

In this paper, Anastasia Boden and Jonathan Riches argue that home-based businesses are an important part of the economy with a very long history. State and local regulators, the authors claim, have often saddled home-based businesses with cumbersome rules that do more to hamper the property rights of homeowners than protect the public interest.

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Tales of Woe: How Dysfunctional Regulation Has Decimated Entire Sectors of Biotechnology

In this paper, Henry I. Miller argues that overweening regulation has forestalled development in major areas of biotechnology, from pharmaceuticals to agriculture.

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The Proper Role of Rules in a Gloriously Unruly Economy

With examples of regulatory policies that failed to achieve their stated goals and regulatory reforms that proved effective and beneficial to the public, the authors of this paper argue for an approach to regulation that encourages, rather than stifles, creativity and competition. This kind of rulemaking, they suggest, makes for a stronger and more inclusive economy.

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Consumer Welfare & the Rule of Law: The Case Against the New Populist Antitrust Movement

The authors of this paper argue that the modern consumer welfare standard is an objective, consistent, reliable, and appropriate framework for good antitrust law and enforcement.

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De-Regulating the Songwriting Business

The authors of this paper argue that outdated consent decrees should be ended to take full advantage of modern technologies for the distribution of music.

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