Justin “Gus” Hurwitz

Assistant Professor of Law and Co-Director of Space, Cyber, and Telecom Law Program

University of Nebraska College of Law

Justin “Gus” Hurwitz

Assistant Professor of Law and Co-Director of Space, Cyber, and Telecom Law Program

University of Nebraska College of Law

Professor Justin (Gus) Hurwitz joined the University of Nebraska College of Law faculty in 2013. His work builds on his background in law, technology, and economics to consider the interface between law and technology and the role of regulation in high-tech industries. He has a particular expertise in telecommunications law and technology, including data- and cybersecurity, and was recognized as a Cyber Security & Data Privacy Trailblazer by the National Law Journal. His work has appeared in the Harvard Journal of Law and Technology, Michigan Telecommunications and Technology Law Review, as well as the George Mason University, University of Connecticut, University of Iowa, Michigan State University, University of Pennsylvania, University of Pittsburgh, and other law review and journals.

He is the Co-Director of the Space, Cyber, and Telecommunications Law Program, focusing on the Cyber and Telecommunications components of the program. Since joining the College of Law Faculty, his work has been cited by the FCC in its 2015 Open Internet Order, Judge Williams in his dissent to the DC Circuit’s affirmance of that Order, and Senator John Thune at the introduction of the MOBILE NOW Act. He has testified before the Senate Commerce Committee on video regulation, participated in roundtable discussions hosted by the FCC, presented to the United States Army’s 7th Signal Command on the technological challenges of cybersecurity regulation, and presented to German and Colombian competition regulators on topics including net neutrality and telecommunications competition policy.

Professor Hurwitz previously was the inaugural Research Fellow at the University of Pennsylvania Law School’s Center for Technology, Innovation and Competition (CTIC), prior to which he was a Visiting Assistant Professor at George Mason University Law School. From 2007–2010 he was a Trial Attorney with the United States Department of Justice Antitrust Division in the Telecommunications and Media Enforcement Section.

Professor Hurwitz has a background in technology having worked at Los Alamos National Lab and interned at the Naval Research Lab prior to law school. During this time his work was recognized by organizations such as the Federal Laboratory Consortium, R&D Magazine, Los Alamos National Lab, IEEE & ACM, and the Corporation for Education Network Initiatives in California. In addition, he held an Internet2 Land Speed World Record with the Guinness Book of World Records.

Professor Hurwitz received his JD from the University of Chicago Law School, where he was an articles editor on the Chicago Journal of International Law and received Olin and MVP2 law and economics scholarships. He also holds an MA in Economics from George Mason University. He received his BA from St. John’s College.

Contributions

Deep Dive Episode 41 – General Data Protection Regime & California Consumer Privacy Act

April 2, 2019

In this episode, Anna Hsia, Chris Riley, Gus Hurwitz, Thomas Hazlett, and Matthew R.A. Heiman discuss the implications of internet privacy legislation on innovation, small businesses, and consumer protection.

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Pepperdine Law Review’s 2019 Symposium: General Data Protection & California Consumer Privacy Act

March 21, 2019

Today’s regulatory landscape presents challenges for public and private entities. Private actors are often faced with conflicting, ambiguous, or altogether absent regulatory frameworks. Is it possible for them to overcome these challenges while delivering the creativity and innovation the marketplace demands? How can government regulators and legislators avoid stifling opportunity, function more efficiently, and enact and enforce sensible and effective regulatory schemes?

Pepperdine Law Review’s 2019 Symposium, in partnership with the Regulatory Transparency Project, explored these vital questions from both the academic and practical perspectives. The first panel of the symposium focused on the General Data Protection and California Consumer Privacy Act.

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Deep Dive Episode 35 – Examining the California Consumer Privacy Act

September 5, 2018

Justin “Gus” Hurwitz (University of Nebraska College of Law), Eric Goldman (Santa Clara University School of Law), and Lindsey L. Tonsager (Covington & Burling) discuss the substance of the California Consumer Privacy Act (including recent amendments), the process that led to its enactment, and how it is likely to affect future privacy regulation in the United States.

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Deep Dive Episode 34 – Net Neutrality and Federalism

July 13, 2018

Justin “Gus” Hurwitz (University of Nebraska College of Law), Brent Skorup (Mercatus Center), and Geoffrey A. Manne (International Center for Law & Economics) discuss questions surrounding recent state efforts to enforce net neutrality principles after the FCC’s decision in 2017 to eliminate common carrier regulations.

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2018 JLEP Symposium: 21st Century Business Models Meet 20th Century Regulation

March 7, 2018

Government regulation is intended to improve the efficiency of markets and protect people from harms they cannot identify or prevent on their own. But, for decades, advocates have debated whether the regulatory process and rules developed through it are too strict or too lax; whether they properly account for all the things society values; and even whether they make society better or worse off on balance. The Journal of Law, Economics & Policy’s Symposium on Regulatory Reform, Transparency, and the Economy explored these and related questions as leading scholars and practitioners examined a number of recent regulatory proposals impacting a broad swath of the American economy – from banking and finance to energy and the environment, and from employment law to the internet economy. Speakers considered and debated how well these proposals would perform their intended functions and how they might be improved.

The symposium featured discussions of research papers prepared by experts working on the Federalist Society’s Regulatory Transparency Project. The proceedings of the Conference were published in a special symposium issue of George Mason’s Journal of Law, Economics & Policy.

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Deep Dive Episode 5 – LabMD v. FTC: A David Against Goliath Story

July 18, 2017

Justin “Gus” Hurwitz (Nebraska College of Law) and Michael Daugherty (LabMD) discuss Michael’s experience defending his medical testing lab against allegations by the FTC that it had deficient cybersecurity practices.

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