2018 JLEP Symposium: Regulating the Modern Workforce

Government regulation is intended to improve the efficiency of markets and protect people from harms they cannot identify or prevent on their own. But, for decades, advocates have debated whether the regulatory process and rules developed through it are too strict or too lax; whether they properly account for all the things society values; and even whether they make society better or worse off on balance. The Journal of Law, Economics & Policy’s Symposium on Regulatory Reform, Transparency, and the Economy explored these and related questions as leading scholars and practitioners examined a number of recent regulatory proposals impacting a broad swath of the American economy – from banking and finance to energy and the environment, and from employment law to the internet economy. Speakers considered and debated how well these proposals would perform their intended functions and how they might be improved.

The symposium featured discussions of research papers prepared by experts working on the Federalist Society’s Regulatory Transparency Project. The proceedings of the Conference were published in a special symposium issue of George Mason’s Journal of Law, Economics & Policy.

James C. Cooper

Associate Professor of Law and Director, Program on Economics & Privacy

Antonin Scalia Law School, George Mason University


Clark Neily

Vice President for Criminal Justice

Cato Institute


Ryan Nunn

Policy Director of the The Hamilton Project and Fellow in Economic Studies

Brookings Institution


Gabriel Scheffler

Regulation Fellow, Penn Program on Regulation

University of Pennsylvania Law School


John Yun

Associate Professor of Law

Antonin Scalia Law School


Labor & Employment

Journal of Law, Economics & Policy

The Federalist Society and Regulatory Transparency Project take no position on particular legal or public policy matters. All expressions of opinion are those of the speaker(s). To join the debate, please email us at [email protected].