Philip Hamburger

Maurice and Hilda Friedman Professor of Law

Columbia Law School

Philip Hamburger

Maurice and Hilda Friedman Professor of Law

Columbia Law School

Philip Hamburger teaches constitutional law and its history at Columbia Law School, where he is the Maurice and Hilda Friedman Professor of Law. He is also President of the New Civil Liberties Alliance—a civil rights organization dedicated to protecting all Americans from the administrative state and other threats to constitutional freedoms.

Before coming to Columbia, he was the John P. Wilson Professor at the University of Chicago Law School. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and he has served on the board of directors of the American Society for Legal History. He has twice received the Sutherland Prize, and has been awarded the Henry Paolucci – Walter Bagehot Book Award, the Hayek Book Prize, and the Bradley Prize.

His books are Liberal Suppression: Section 501(c)(3) and the Taxation of Speech (Chicago 2018), The Administrative Threat (Encounter 2017), Is Administrative Law Unlawful? (Chicago 2014), Law and Judicial Duty (Harvard 2008), and Separation of Church and State (Harvard 2002). His articles on religious liberty include: “Religious Liberty in Philadelphia” Emory Law Journal (2005)“More is Less” Virginia Law Review (2004)and “A Constitutional Right of Religious Exemption: An Historical Perspective” George Washington Law Review (1992).

Contributions

Deep Dive Episode 30 – Arizona Dumps Deference: The Beginning of the End for Chevron?

May 1, 2018

Philip Hamburger (Columbia Law School) and Jonathan Riches (Goldwater Institute) discuss Arizona’s recent passage of legislation eliminating Chevron deference in Arizona state courts, how this new law might change state agency rulemaking and enforcement, and whether this law can serve as a model for the rest of the country, and the federal government.

Listen to this podcast