Peter Wallison

Senior Fellow, Arthur F. Burns Fellow in Financial Policy Studies

American Enterprise Institute

Peter Wallison

Senior Fellow, Arthur F. Burns Fellow in Financial Policy Studies

American Enterprise Institute

Peter J. Wallison holds the Arthur F. Burns Chair in Financial Policy Studies and is co-director of AEI’s program on Financial Policy Studies. Prior to joining AEI, he practiced banking, corporate and financial law at Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher in Washington, D.C., and New York. Mr. Wallison has held a number of government positions.  From June 1981 to January 1985, he was General Counsel of the United States Treasury Department, where he had a significant role in the development of the Reagan Administration’s proposals for deregulation in the financial services industry. During 1986 and 1987, Mr. Wallison was White House counsel to President Ronald Reagan, and between 1972 and 1976, he served first as Special Assistant to New York’s Gov. Nelson A. Rockefeller and, subsequently, as counsel to Mr. Rockefeller as vice president of the United States.

Mr. Wallison was admitted to practice before the courts of New York and the District of Columbia, and is retired from practice in New York. He continues to be a member of the District of Columbia Bar Association.  He received his undergraduate degree from Harvard College in 1963 and law degree from Harvard Law School in 1966.

Mr. Wallison is the author of Ronald Reagan: The Power of Conviction and the Success of His Presidency, published in December 2002 by Westview Press. On campaign finance, he is the author (with Joel Gora) of Better Parties, Better Government, (AEI Press 2009). On financial or regulatory matters, he is the author of Back From the Brink, a proposal for a private deposit insurance system, and co-author of Nationalizing Mortgage Risk: The Growth of Fannie Mae and Freddie MacThe GAAP Gap: Corporate Disclosure in the Internet AgeCompetitive Equity: A Better Way to Organize Mutual Funds; Bad History, Worse Policy: How a False Narrative about the Financial Crisis Led to the Dodd-Frank Act (AEI Press 2013); and Hidden In Plain Sight: What Caused the World’s Worst Financial Crisis and Why it Could Happen Again (Encounter Books 2015). His most recent book is Judicial Fortitude: The Last Chance to Rein in the Administrative State, published by Encounter Books in October 2018.

He testifies frequently before committees of Congress, and is a frequent contributor to the op-ed pages of the Wall Street Journal and other print and online journals. He has also been a speaker at many conferences on financial services, housing, the causes of the financial crisis, the Dodd-Frank Act, accounting, and corporate governance, and was a member of the Shadow Financial Regulatory Committee between 1995 and 2015. He was a member of the SEC Advisory Committee on Improvements to Financial Reporting (2008), co-Chair of the Pew Financial Reform Task Force (2009), and a member of the congressionally- appointed Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission (2009-2011). In May 2011, for his work in financial policy, Mr. Wallison received an honorary doctorate in Humane Letters from the University of Colorado.

Contributions

Justice Thomas on Controlling the Tech Giants

Peter Wallison

April 29, 2021

How to control the tech giants has continued to raise concerns about both media bias and free speech. In a new concurring opinion, Justice Clarence Thomas has provided some important thoughts and distinctions on the topic that will likely stir some new thinking in the legal world.

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An Empty Attack on the Nondelegation Doctrine

Peter Wallison

April 22, 2021

Peter Wallison argues that the Constitution’s separation of powers provides ample justification for a revival of the nondelegation doctrine.

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What’s Next for Fannie, Freddie, and Housing Finance Reform?

December 20, 2019

On December 10, 2019, the Regulatory Transparency Project hosted an event at the National Press Club in Washington, DC. The title of the event was “What’s Next for Fannie, Freddie, and Housing Finance Reform?”

The Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) oversees the administration of both Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae. What’s next for the agency? What are the priorities that the agency should be pursuing?

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Deep Dive Episode 84 – What’s Next for Fannie, Freddie, and Housing Finance Reform?

December 19, 2019

The Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) oversees the administration of both Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae. What’s next for the agency? What are the priorities that the agency should be pursuing? This episode features remarks from FHFA Director Mark Calabria and a discussion of the issues with reform by our panelists.

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The Dangers of Independence for Executive Branch Agencies

Peter Wallison

July 19, 2018

There may be cases where executive branch officials need to be independent of the president, but they are likely to be exceedingly few. The Supreme Court, if it takes an appeal from the 5th Circuit’s decision, should approach the issue from this perspective.

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