Nicolas Petit

Professor of Law

University of Liege (Belgium)

Nicolas Petit

Professor of Law

University of Liege (Belgium)

Professor Nicolas Petit is Professor of Law at Liege University, Belgium and a Research Professor at the School of Law of the University of South Australia in Adelaide (UniSA).

Professor Nicolas Petit’s research focuses on antitrust law, intellectual property, and law in a context of technological change. His recent written works deal with the legal challenges created by the introduction of artificial intelligence and robotics in society. He is also working on a book on technology platforms’ competition.

Professor Petit holds a PhD from the University of Liege (Belgium), an LL.M from the College of Europe (Bruges), a Master’s degree from the University of Paris II and an LLB from the University of Paris V. He practiced law with a leading US law firm in Brussels and he also served as a Clerk at the Commercial Chamber of the French Supreme Court. In 2005 he attended Harvard Law School’s Visiting Researchers Programme.

Professor Petit is the co-author of EU Competition Law and Economics (Oxford University Press, 2012) and the author of Droit européen de la concurrence (Domat Montchrestien, 2013), a monograph which was awarded the prize for the best law book of the year at the Constitutionnal Court in France. In 2017, he received the GCR award for academic excellence.

Contributions

Antitrust & Big Tech

June 11, 2019

A conversation about the history of antitrust law, the consumer welfare standard, and the tech giants.

Facebook, Amazon, Apple, Netflix, and Google provide extremely valuable products and services, but their size, market share, and other concerns such as user privacy have led to concerns that they are wielding too much power.

Proponents of “populist” or “hipster” antitrust advocate for limiting the size of firms. This would require changing the Consumer Welfare Standard, which has been in place since the 1970’s.

Mark Zuckerburg’s testimony before Congress in April 2018 ignited a public debate about whether and how tech companies should be regulated. That debate continues and shows no signs of resolution.

Is it time to revisit the standards used in antitrust law? Our experts explore.

Watch this video