Chris Riley

Director, Public Policy

Mozilla

Chris Riley

Director, Public Policy

Mozilla

Chris Riley is the Director of Public Policy at Mozilla, working to advance the open internet through public policy analysis and advocacy, strategic planning, coalition building, and community engagement. Chris manages the global Mozilla public policy team and its active engagements in Washington, Brussels, New Delhi, and around the world. Chris works on all things internet policy, motivated by the belief that an open, disruptive internet delivers tremendous socioeconomic benefits, and that if we as a global society don’t work to protect and preserve the internet’s core features, those benefits will go away. The internet ecosystem isn’t perfect – but we have to be smart in how we address its problems while continuing to invest in its strengths. Getting internet policy right is crucial for that future.

Prior to joining Mozilla, Chris worked as a program manager at the U.S. Department of State on Internet freedom, a policy counsel with the non-profit public interest organization Free Press, and an attorney-advisor at the Federal Communications Commission. Chris holds a Ph.D. in Computer Science from Johns Hopkins University, where he worked as a research and teaching assistant and an instructor, and a J.D. from Yale Law School, taking internships at the Electronic Frontier Foundation and the law firm Ropes & Gray. He has published scholarship on topics including innovation policy, cognitive framing, graph drawing, and distributed load balancing.

Contributions

Deep Dive Episode 41 – General Data Protection Regime & California Consumer Privacy Act

April 2, 2019

In this episode, Anna Hsia, Chris Riley, Gus Hurwitz, Thomas Hazlett, and Matthew R.A. Heiman discuss the implications of internet privacy legislation on innovation, small businesses, and consumer protection.

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Pepperdine Law Review’s 2019 Symposium: General Data Protection & California Consumer Privacy Act

March 21, 2019

Today’s regulatory landscape presents challenges for public and private entities. Private actors are often faced with conflicting, ambiguous, or altogether absent regulatory frameworks. Is it possible for them to overcome these challenges while delivering the creativity and innovation the marketplace demands? How can government regulators and legislators avoid stifling opportunity, function more efficiently, and enact and enforce sensible and effective regulatory schemes?

Pepperdine Law Review’s 2019 Symposium, in partnership with the Regulatory Transparency Project, explored these vital questions from both the academic and practical perspectives. The first panel of the symposium focused on the General Data Protection and California Consumer Privacy Act.

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Reboot 2018: Are We Headed for a U.S. General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR)?

October 24, 2018

With continued scrutiny over social media companies’ data practices, states are stepping in to pass aggressive new privacy laws. For instance, the recently enacted California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 will be the toughest data privacy law in the nation when it goes into effect in 2020. But with fears over navigating a patchwork of inconsistent laws, tech companies are increasingly interested in a federal privacy bill that will preempt the states. What might this look like, how likely is it to happen in the next Congress, and what will it mean for consumers?

The Regulatory Transparency Project co-sponsored the Lincoln Network’s Reboot 2018 conference.

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