Alex J. Pollock

Principal Deputy Director, Office of Financial Research

U.S. Department of Treasury

Alex J. Pollock

Principal Deputy Director, Office of Financial Research

U.S. Department of Treasury

Alex J. Pollock currently serves as the Principal Deputy Director of the U.S. Department of Treasury’s Office of Financial Research.

Prior to joining the Department of Treasury, Pollock was a Resident Distinguished Senior Fellow, in Finance, Insurance & Trade at the R Street Institute. In that capacity, he provided thought and policy leadership on financial issues, including the understanding of financial systems, cycles of boom and bust, financial crises, risk and uncertainty, central banking and the politics of finance.

Alex joined R Street from the American Enterprise Institute, where he was a resident fellow. Prior to that, he was president and CEO of the Federal Home Loan Bank of Chicago.

Pollock also serves as a director of the CME Group, a director of Ascendium Education Group, a director and past-chairman of the Great Books Foundation, and a member of the Advisory Board of the Heller College of Business at Roosevelt University. He was a past president of the International Union for Housing Finance.

He is the author of Boom and Bust: Financial Cycles and Human Prosperity (2011) and Finance and Philosophy: Why We’re Always Surprised (2018).

Alex received his bachelor’s degree in philosophy from Williams College, a master’s in philosophy from the University of Chicago and a master’s of public administration in international affairs from Princeton University.

Contributions

What’s Next for Fannie, Freddie, and Housing Finance Reform?

December 20, 2019

On December 10, 2019, the Regulatory Transparency Project hosted an event at the National Press Club in Washington, DC. The title of the event was “What’s Next for Fannie, Freddie, and Housing Finance Reform?”

The Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) oversees the administration of both Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae. What’s next for the agency? What are the priorities that the agency should be pursuing?

Watch this video

Deep Dive Episode 84 – What’s Next for Fannie, Freddie, and Housing Finance Reform?

December 19, 2019

The Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) oversees the administration of both Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae. What’s next for the agency? What are the priorities that the agency should be pursuing? This episode features remarks from FHFA Director Mark Calabria and a discussion of the issues with reform by our panelists.

Listen to this podcast

Key Points in the Treasury’s Fannie/Freddie Paper

Alex J. Pollock

September 11, 2019

The important parts of the Treasury’s new paper on Fannie and Freddie reform are not the legislative recommendations, since legislation is not going to happen. They are the administrative steps which can actually be taken now, with political will.

Read this article

Deep Dive Episode 58 – LIBOR – Will a $200 Trillion Global Benchmark Disappear – or Not?

June 13, 2019

LIBOR is a hugely important interest rate benchmark, used globally and embedded in over $200 trillion of financial contracts. Experts discuss the challenges and future of this index.

Listen to this podcast

Fed ‘Independence’ is a Slippery Slope

Alex J. Pollock

April 5, 2019

In the light of the political reality of Federal Reserve history, a completely independent Fed looks impossible. In the light of the unknowable future, it looks undesirable.

Read this article

Deep Dive Episode 36 – What Should the FHFA’s 2019 Agenda Be?

January 8, 2019

Ed DeMarco (Housing Policy Council) and Alex J. Pollock (R Street Institute) discuss the key issues and projects for the Federal Housing Finance Agency going forward and what it can do to lead reform of Fannie and Freddie — and reform of American housing finance in general.

Listen to this podcast

When Is a Bureaucracy So Independent That It’s Unconstitutional?

Alex J. Pollock

July 24, 2018

In a conceptually important opinion, the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals has just ruled that the governance structure of the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) is unconstitutional.

Read this article